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Posts Tagged ‘Airpirates’

When you think of Steampunk, images of brass goggles, aviator caps, and pocket watches immediately spring to mind.

The question is, why?

Steampunk is a genre full of action, adventure, and innovention–what says that better than a pair of brass goggles?  They could be the goggles of an airpirate, plundering the open skies on his air ship, an explorer in her balloon, a car shark motoring to his next game, or of a mad scientist about to invent the next modern marvel or machine of mayhem. 

But why brass? 

Sure, there are other metals, but something about shiny brass invokes that Victorian feel…

Just like pocket watches, cogs, gears, and clock hands abound in Steampunk (they also make great jewelry).  It’s a very classic image of a bygone era of gentleman, of craftsmanship.  Since Steampunk is very rooted in the Victorian era, the pocket watch is an obvious accessory of choice (though there’s plenty of room for wrist-watches and time-keeping rayguns).  Of course, a pocket watch doesn’t just have to be a timekeeping device.  Perhaps it’s a communicator–or a time machine….
Aviator Cap from Clockwork Couture

Aviator Cap from Clockwork Couture

Don’t forget your leather aviator cap!  Since, in Steampunk, most things–even advanced technology–is made with Victorian materials and/or in the style/manner of the Victorians, your aviator and adventures wouldn’t ben wearing plastic crash helmets.  They go with a balloon, a hoverboard, a spaceship, or even a plain old automobile.  The aviator cap is another a symbol of action, adventure, and innovation.  It’s the sign of someone boldly going where no one has gone before, of defying convention, of following their dreams.

There are many other things that are quintessentially Steampunk, and there are plenty of reasons beyond mine why Brass goggles, Aviator caps, and pocket watches are a bit iconic.   I’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas.  As usual, one lucky poster will win a tiara!   The winner will be posted on Friday!

Have a great week!

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We all know Steampunkers party like it’s 1899.  That it’s a steam-powered world of airships, cogs, clockwork, crazy inventions, and brass goggles with plenty of room for air pirates, brass robots, and corset-and-bustle-wearing vampire hunters. 

But what’s beyond Steampunk?

Here are a few things I’ve found, though many seem to overlap.  This is by no means a definitive or exhaustive list:

Biopunk— Features those who are a product of biological experimentation, usually against the backdrop of a totalitarian government or megacorproations who are abusing science for personal gain or social control.

Clockpunk—A world where steam technology has been replaced by intricate clockwork designs. 

Cyberpunk—Near-future earth with super-high technology and the breakdown of social order, usually with dystopian/anarchist /rebellion themes featuring conflict between humans and robots/cyborgs/megacorporations. 

Cyberprep-Cyberpunk featuring a leisure-driven, happy society instead of a gritty one where technology and body modifications are used for recreation and pleasure.

Dieselpunk—The world just beyond steampunk where gas has replaced steam, steal replaced brass, it’s a world of flappers, gangsters—the roaring twenties though noir/dystopian goggles (I’ve also seen it called Oilpunk).

Gasolinepunk—The 1960’s hotrod era taken to the max.

Monsterpunk—Mechanical and steampunk elements mixed together in a monster world (or one powered by monsters).    Monster Commute is a good example: http://www.monstercommute.com

Oilpunk/Petrolpunk/Petropunk—An idealized version of an oil-based society.  Think floating cities with giant rocket engines.

Sailpunk—Where new technologies take on a nautical aesthetic, such as in the movie Treasure Planet.

 Do you have anything to add?  Elfpunk (those great rock & roll and car-racing Elf stories that take place in our world.)  Post-Cyberpunk(Cyberpunk minus the dystopia)…

Any of these genres spark any ideas (or new genres to explore)?

 I’d love to hear your ideas.   Unfortunately, I can’t find any more art deco tiaras, but I have found some cute tiny ones.  So one lucky poster will win a baby tiara and a bag of productivity pixy dust. 

 Have a great week everyone.  Check back on Friday for the winner!

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And the winner of my very last tiara is…

drum-roll please

~*~Deborah~*~

I’m so happy to discover this blog, because I’ve become a fan of Steampunk and just started plotting a YA and now I know how to describe it.

Congrats Deborah.  email me asap at suzanne lazear (@) hotmail (no spaces) so I can get you your tiara in time for nationals…congrats on your award and I’ll see you there.

It’s Friday–and a holiday weekend.  Happy Independence DayHave fun and be safe. 

Need something to do?  Check out the calendar section at Dieselpunkswhich has listings for steampunk and dieselpunk events all over America!  (What’s dieselpunk, you ask?  Dieselpunk comes after steampunk, roughly the 1920’s-1950’s when diesel was king, how cool is that?). 

Here’s a steampunk band called Abney Park which I had heard of but hadn’t actually checked out before now.  This is a video of their song “Airship Pirate” shot in their studio–which is exactly where a steampunk band should be rehearsing, the belly of the HMS Ophelia!  I really love how they blend different genres and the violin adds so much.  Check out their decor and costumes.  Enjoy!


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One thing I am fascinated by are flying machines and how they so easily—and quintessentially—fit into the steampunk genre.  After all, what’s steampunk without airships?

Dupuy Lome Dirigeable

Jules Verne enchanted us all with balloon travel in “Around the World in Eighty Days” and “Five weeks in a Balloon.”  Who wouldn’t want to travel in a helium filled balloon?   But aircraft get even bigger—even today, such as blimps and dirigibles, which are used for tourism, camera platforms, advertising, surveillance, and research. It’s not that far off to think of them on an Airship from the Golden Compasseven grander scale, such as passenger ships as elegant as the Victorian steamers, transporting people from one place to another with speed, elegance, and spectacular views. 
steampunk airshipThey could be grand and elegant passenger ships of gleaming wood and polished brass, or could be patched and clunky cargo haulers, or these vessels could be filled with the most fearsome people to haunt steampunk skies—air pirates!   

 

But ships aren’t the only things that can fly.  I’m also fascinated250px-Leonardo_Design_for_a_Flying_Machine%2C_c__1488 with the idea of personal aircraft—such as the idea of “detachable wings” – small powered gliders with wings reminiscent of a Da Vinci sketch.  One could almost imagine a ruffian in his leather aviation cap and brass goggles soaring through the sky on such a contraption. 

skysurfingHoverboards also enthrall me.  A steampunk teen could easily be dodging the police on some sort of brass and wood flying skate/surfboard powered by rockets, the sun, or who knows…

Finally, we can’t forget the flying car—whether it simply floats or has giant purple bat wings.  This is yet another fabulous, flying machine that could find a home in a steampunk world. 

Don’t even get me started on floating cities. 

What’s your favorite flying machine—fictional or fact?  Do you wish you could fly out the window on a red dirt devil?  Soar the skies in a giant airship?  A poster will be chosen at random on Friday to receive a bag of “productivity pixy dust” to inspire you and a small sparkly tiara. 

Happy Dreaming!

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